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The Tolkien Trail, Hurst Green - Saturday 13th April 2019

A party of eleven of us set off from the Shireburn Arms, Hurst Green to explore the Tolkien Trail in the Ribble Valley. The first leg of the walk takes you across fields from which you have fine views of Pendle Hill and the surrounding countryside. Eventually we reached Stonyhurst College the Jesuit School with it's fine Grade 1 listed buildings.

From here we made the descent into the Ribble Valley passing Cromwell's Bridge over the River Hodder and named after him when he marched his army across on the way to Walton-le-Dale to fight the Battle of Preston in 1648. The route then leaves the river and follows farm tracks to reach the River Ribble at the junction of the two rivers.

The path continues along the banks of the Ribble undulating through the beautiful Lancashire countryside. On the way you pass the Jumbles where the river tumbles across the limestone ridge and the mysterious stone cross on the adjacent hillside, Finally you reach the graceful aqueduct which arches across the river.

From here you make the climb from the river back to the pub where you can enjoy an excellent lunch in the old manor house and now the Shireburn Arms Hotel. The distance was about six miles.

Ramblers at the start

Pendle Hill


The Observatory Stonyhurst School

Stonyhurst

Cromwell's Bridge. New  road bridge in background

Ready for a coffee break

Junction Rivers Hodder and Ribble

Along the Ribble river bank

The Junbles

Steep climb back to the pub!

Waiting for lunch

















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Further information:

http://www.packhorseinnbury.co.uk/about

http://heywoodmonkey.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/th…

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